Sunday, 6 July 2014

Fritter Frenzy

Elderberry Fritters
5 July 2014

     As children, Miriam and her sister Karen, looked forward with great anticipation at this time of year, to the annual feast in their Mennonite household, of elderberry fritters with maple syrup. 
     A few years ago Karen suggested we revive the custom and we have been doing it ever since. Normally it is a Canada Day treat for us (1 July) but this year the flowers were not quite ready and we delayed it for a few days.
     The first step is to find bushes with large, fully formed flowers which are cut and harvested.

Elderberry flowers
  
Karen about to cut the flowers
       Back at home, the stalks are trimmed while a batter is being made in which the flowers will be dipped.

Karen cutting the stems off
     The flowers are ready for the batter.

      
     And now they are dipped.


     And into the deep fryer of hot oil they go.


     Once they are ready they are brought to the table to be consumed with a liberal helping of delicious Ontario Maple Syrup.

Perfect elderberry fritters



     This is not exactly a low calorie dessert but we throw caution to the wind, do it once a year, and keep alive a wonderful tradition of using local produce to furnish delicious food.
     You can only imagine just how much Miriam is enjoying her portion!


     

13 comments:

  1. It makes me feel hungry! It's also interesting to hear about different customs.

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  2. Hello David,
    Nice to see that the traditions of each country so different.
    It looks delicious.
    A good new week.

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  3. Interesting! Seems taste good!

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  4. Fascinating, David, and something that I must try. I love elderflower flavoured drinks, and in my younger days I used to make elderberry wine - it had great depth and body and was like a Portuguese red, heading towards a ruby Port! It used to run out at about 14% a.b.v! I learned my craft from my father who was a biochemist, and used to ferment in 25 litre Pyrex containers as the exothermic fermentation meant that you didn't have to keep the containers in a warm place!

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    1. Powerful stuff, Richard! I think you should make another batch before our visit next year. Then we'll quaff a couple of glasses and see all the Barn Owls we want!

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  5. Mmm. Never heard of that one David but looks delicious. I do know about elderberry wine though.

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  6. Mmmmmm. Delicious! We have never eaten this dish, it certainly is very good. In our country have long flowers overblown (a month ago). We have to wait until next year...
    Regards

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  7. Looks good ;-))
    Greetings Tinie

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  8. Nice! I made elderflower wine once as a kid - it was shocking! I think the fitters loo much better!

    Sorry for slow reply - hectic weeks!

    Cheers - Stewart M

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  9. How interesting! I had never heard of deep fried flowers, or even realized that Elderberry flowers were edible.

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  10. Unfortunately, the last 5 pictures are not visible.
    I only see five large white spots :-(
    I think it is wonderful uitag and tasted delicious :-)

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  11. In Italy we call these flowers Sambuco. I 'd like to try this dessert.Wish you a nice Summer.

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  12. I never ate flowers but I heard they are very good (Sambucus and Robinia).

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