Sunday, 29 June 2014

Taylor Lake Trees

Taylor Lake Trees
22 June 2014

    The variety of trees and shrubs on our walk around Taylor Lake, described in the previous post, provided great enjoyment for everyone, and in some instances tested our identification skills.
    One of the easiest of all trunks to recognize, thereby facilitating identification of the tree, is that of a mature Shagbark Hickory Carya ovata, with its characteristic long curling strips of very shaggy bark. 


    This fine specimen has graced the woodland for many years.

    Less familiar to most of us was Poison-sumac Toxicodendron vernix and I am sure that most of us would not have recognized it had Larry not pointed it out. In fact, it's not beyond the realm of possibility that some of  us might have handled it in the way one does, to examine the structure of the leaves and stem more closely. Thank goodness we did not, since this plant rivals poison ivy (it is in the same genus) in its ability to deliver serious skin irritation and painful blisters.


12 comments:

  1. Trees are beautiful, think about the old could tell his story.
    Nice pictures.
    Great new summer week, Marit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's true, Marit. Think of all that has happened during the life of that magnificent old tree. It boggles the mind.

      Delete
  2. Hello David,
    Beautiful photos of this tree.
    Have a good week.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That Hickory reminds me of some of our eucalypts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's true. I remember so well how the bark would pile up around the base of the tree. If I am not mistaken eucalypts shed bark rather than leaves, don't they?

      Delete
  4. Beautifully portrayed David.
    Greetings Tinie

    ReplyDelete
  5. A visit to a beautiful tree, an ancient of the past.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sometimes think the same way about myself, Bob!

      Delete
  6. Bird watching isn't too dangerous after all then? All those dodgy plants and trees out to get their own back on folk keep cutting them back.

    I Must admit the last lily has lovely shades.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Very interesting, David. That Shagbark Hickory looks as if it could be home to many creatures.

    I can remember, during my wanderings in the USA, being concerned that I might encounter Poison Ivy wihout having a clue what she looks like! Now you've given me another worry with Poison-sumac - it looks so innocuous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am glad that Poison Ivy did the decent thing, Richard, and left you alone!

      Delete
  8. Oops ... recognize trees is not given to me lol ...
    Nice to agree to put the subject in the spotlight :-)

    ReplyDelete