Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Chukar Partridge (Perdrix choukar) in Waterloo, Ontario

7 October 2015

     Remarkably, a Chukar Partridge Alectoris chukar arrived without ceremony in the backyard of Barb Peeren at 535 Glen Manor Boulevard, Waterloo, Ontario. This bird has obviously escaped from a game bird collection somewhere, and when I went to visit it, it seemed quite confiding and appeared to be accustomed to humans in close proximity.


     It has made its way to Barb's yard and has adjusted to it and made itself at home. It is feeding primarily on peanuts knocked down from the bird feeders by Blue Jays Cyanocitta cristata and Barb has put out a dish of water for it. We can only hope that it does not fall prey to a marauding cat.


     In a very magnanimous gesture Barb is inviting other birders who wish to see this bird to visit her house. Please email ahead of time to arrange a time: barb.peeren@gmail.com.
     I wish to express my personal thanks for the warm welcome she accorded me and permitted me to take photographs at my leisure.

16 comments:

  1. Hello
    Very nice bird, I never shoot a picture.... maybe one day I hope.
    Kiss

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  2. Preciosa perdiz, no conocía esta especie. Si parece que haya sido escapada, aún así es una bonita ave. Saludos desde España.

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  3. Hello David, hope this bird will survive, sad thing is that it has no mate. Kind people to let you take pictures of it.
    Regards,
    Roos

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  4. What a beautiful bird and clever to escape. I don't like the word game in this context.
    It can't be fun to shoot and kill animals for pleasure. Hopefully the bird gets a good life at Barb's place.
    Gr Jan W

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    1. I agree with you Jan. I have no argument with people hunting for food, as is the case for example with our aboriginal people, but mindless shooting in the name of "sport"is hard to understand in this day and age.The fact that people still engage in trophy hunting in Africa boggles the mind.

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  5. We call it 'Red-legged Partridge', but it is better to be 'Chuckar'. Well photographed David.

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    1. Red-legged Partridge is a different species, Bob. Look at the "necklace"of spots and streaks on a Red-legged Partridge, absent on a Chukar Partridge.

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  6. What a cool bird to have land in one's yard. Wish I lived closer!

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  7. I live on Beckwith Court and had the female and male camp out under our pine tree for three weeks.
    First the female showed up, then three days later the male arrived.
    They lasted three weeks. I haven’t seen them for the last four weeks.
    They would travel together around the neighbourhood, but seemed to use the pine tree as home base.
    Although they would leave to roost somewhere else.
    Are they still together?

    I must be experiencing empty nest syndrome.


    I wonder if they’ll make it through the winter?

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    1. I only ever saw the one bird, Matt. As to whether they will survive the winter, I expect they will. I have seen them at high elevations in Colorado where they get lots of snow and cold temperatures.

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  8. Very nice images of a beautiful partridge, I like this kind of bird

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  9. Truly a beautiful bird.
    One that you do not just encounter while!
    Beautiful colors and a beautiful drawing.

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  10. Just picked one up roadkill on bleams had no idea what it was! Thanks for the informative page

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  11. I have just seen this bird munching on my garden plants! I live in northeastern Guelph, Ontario. It took me forever to identify it!

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    1. I'm glad that my blog was able to help!

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  12. Thanks for your valuable info’s regarding Chukar partridge Birdsfacts I also like this Chukar partridge wallpaper. I hope necessary prevention can escalate the problems. I hope everyone will follow those.

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