Monday, 27 April 2015

Mute Swan (Cygne tuberculé)

     Mute Swans Cygnus olor are familiar birds to many people around the world and are found in the company of humans. They often originate as members of a waterfowl collection and are released or escape into the wild to establish feral populations.
    Before leaving for Victoria I observed a pair already on their nest and here is their egg, surrounded unfortunately by the inevitable detritus of humanity.


     This individual must have become really attuned to the presence of humans for the nest was close to a walking path and she seemed undisturbed by people walking by in close proximity.




     She turned her egg very carefully before settling down to lay another I presume. I haven't yet had a chance to check the current status but I will be sure to do so. I fully expect that later in the season we will have a fine flotilla of adults and cygnets to add interest and beauty to our walks.
     This handsome American Herring Gull Larus smithsonianus was swimming close by and I have little doubt that an unattended egg would make a fine snack.


11 comments:

  1. Oh my, that is an amazing series, but a little frightened for the poor swan being so close to people ... And gulls (but that latter is nature). The people part is not natural.

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  2. Bonsoir,

    Une très belle publication. Vos photos sont toujours extraordinaires.
    Pensez-vous que Madame cygne est comme la femelle paon qui pond un oeuf tous les deux jours et ne les couve que lorsque les oeufs sont tous pondus ?

    ❀ Gros bisous ❀

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  3. Neat series on the Mute Swan. I hope all goes well with the swan's babies.. Great post.

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  4. Hello David,
    Beautiful pictures of the mute swan.
    I hope there are many young swans on a while.
    Best regards, Irma

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  5. Hello David,
    Mute swans are indeed to be seen in large numbers. To bad they use all that litter of humans in their nests.
    Good luck on your next trip.
    Regards,
    Roos

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  6. From what I've seen of Mute Swans here David, they're not slow to defend themselves and their young. I'd not want to approach one! Are you sure that bird is a female?

    Best wishes - - Richard

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  7. Beautiful series of swan, now waiting for the little ones.
    Greetings Tinie

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  8. Beautiful pictures of the swan loving her egg reverses eht Enst. The nest is indeed surrounded by rubbish but when the swan is there more quietly brooding then it is good. Nice to see you again later going to see how it is with the swan and nest.

    The picture of your herring is really wonderful to see!

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  9. A bit sad to see this egg among human garbage.... I hope she manages to breed a few beautiful signets but some people are stupid enough to tease birds so I wonder what can be the issue for this nest?!
    Hugs from France :)

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