Monday, 13 April 2015

Killdeer (Pluvier kildir)

     Killdeer Charadrius vociferus is commonly found over much of the North American continent, and is one of the early spring arrivals in southern Ontario. Its call, from which it gets its name, is familiar to birders everywhere.


     This series of pictures is designed to show how its cryptic plumage provides it with very effective camouflage. When sitting on its nest the brown of its back merges into the substrate and it is is virtually invisible to either ground predators or marauding hawks.


     If the bird is disturbed it is a master at feigning injury and draws the attacker away from its nest with a broken wing display, until it has lured the would-be predator a safe distance from its nest, when it simply takes to the air and flies away.



     Killdeers are prone to nest in locations which would seem to be entirely unsuitable, such as at the side of a gravel path leading to a building, but perhaps there are clues which work in their favour not always detected by us.
     In any event it is a member of the familiar and much-loved avifauna of this area, bringing delight to birders and non-birders alike.

18 comments:

  1. The Killdeer are so cute, great collection of photos.. Happy Monday!

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  2. Lovely bird and nice series of pictures.. Regards from Madrid..

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  3. Brilliant pictures of the Killdeer David.

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  4. Hello David,
    Beautiful pictures of this beautiful bird.
    Have a good new week.

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  5. Hello David, yes they are masters of disguise. We do know this bird here as well. Mostly seen on the coast where there are pebbles.
    Thank you for your reacation on my blog about the Peregine falcons.
    Regards,
    Roos

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  6. A super series on the Killdeer, David. I got quite excited when I spotted one in Colorado. I'd be even more excited to find one over here!

    I hope you both have a great time ahead of you - - - - Richard
















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  7. I love these little guys, but it's hard to understand why they nest on the ground. I stumble on them often when we're in Oregon and always want to say, don't pretend you're hurt, I would never harm you or the babies.

    Last season the manager at the RV park where we stay had one whole space roped off because there was a killdeer nest there. I loved that she was willing to do that in spite of the lost income to the park.

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  8. Bonjour cher ami,

    Son petit oeil vif lui apporte un certain charme. La nature étonne étrangement parfois. Elle détient des secrets indiscernables.
    La malice de ce petit oiseau est très astucieux.
    Vos clichés sont superbes et combien agréables à admirer.

    ❀ ✺ Gros bisous ✺ ❀
    Un grand merci pour votre gentil commentaire.

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  9. Hello :)
    Very nice birds and photos.
    I loved ♥
    Happy Spring my Friend.

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  10. Our closely related Little Ringed Plovers have just arrived for the summer too..........

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  11. Their behaviour, appearance and lifestyle so remind me of our own Ringed Plover and little ringed Plover, both of which are of course much smaller than a Killdeer. I too dream of finding a Killdeer here in the UK, maybe even in Pilling?

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  12. Very nice series, David.
    Gr Jan W

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  13. Que bonito!!! Un abrazo desde España.

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  14. A beautiful small plover. This I have never seen. I also plovers can engrave pictures but these look a little different than yours (I still have to put them though). These have with you to white eyes and mine black:-) Very nice pictures of that beautiful plover

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  15. Beautiful pictures you have of the little ringed plover.
    Greetings Tinie

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  16. Hello dear friends!
    Yes back from "down under" and much too quickly!
    We had a ball with the Oz family, especially the grand-children...
    I bet you too will have plenty of photos to sort out on your return too.
    I am battling with a couple of birds to ID that I can't find on Aussie websites.
    If I send you a pic by mail, I wonder if you could give a hand on one of them, I bet you have a field guide to Australian birds?!
    Good luck with sorting out your pics, can't wait to see what you're bringing back!!
    Love to the both of you :)

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  17. A gorgeous bird, David. Fantastic that you found him. I think that's not easy because of his camouflage colors. Great series and interesting info. Have a good weekend. Greetings, Joke

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